Toshiba develops small motor driver IC for vehicle applications

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 Toshiba America Electronic Components (TAEC) has announced a small-sized motor driver IC for DC brushed motors used in vehicle engine applications such as electronic throttles and valve controls. The new TB9051FTG, housed in a small, flat 6mm x 6mm P-QFN28 package, employs double-diffused MOSFET (DMOS FET) transistors as driver circuits.

As with its recently announced line of DMOS FET transistor arrays, Toshiba selected DMOS FET devices for the TB9051FTG driver circuits. As these devices do not require base current biasing, they have virtually no input current, which lets them process high current density per device area with low on-resistance. This enables low output voltage drop – in turn, allowing the new motor driver IC to operate with a high degree of efficiency.

“These new motor driver ICs, due to their small size and underlying technology, have the flexibility to enable control of a range of automotive electronics – not only engine applications, which are the primary target, but also other onboard systems, such as wing mirrors and trunk locks, operating at up to 5A,” says Deepak Mithani, senior director, Mixed-Signal Business Unit, System LSI Group at TAEC. “Moreover, because user safety is paramount, Toshiba has carried out a range of functional safety analyses to simulate various system failures, and we supply this documentation to our customers to further support their design-in process.”

The new TB9051FTG motor driver IC features a single, H-bridge channel and ultra-low on-resistance of 0.34Ω (H-side + L-side, max). Its two power supplies, VBAT and VCC, operate at 4.5V to 28V and 4.5V to 5.5V, respectively. Control functions include motor-related (forward, reverse, brake), as well as PWM control, current limit control, H-side current monitor, diagnosis output and power-on-reset (POR) circuit. Built-in detection circuits include over current, over heat, and low/high voltage.

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Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

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