Audi expands e-gas production capacity

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Audi has announced that it is to expand the production capacity of its sustainably produced ‘e-gas’ fuel. Audi has partnered with German heating specialist Viessmann to utilise its expertise from the electricity and gas sector. The Viessmann Group is the first of Audi’s technical partner companies to produce additional quantities of the synthetic fuel in a new type of biological process. 

Audi’s e-gas is generally produced in two key process steps – electrolysis and methanation. In the first step, renewably generated electricity is used to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. In the second step, the hydrogen is reacted with CO₂ to yield synthetic methane. In the Audi e-gas plant in Werlte in the German state of Lower Saxony, this is done using a chemical-catalytic process under high pressure and high temperature. 

In the new Viessmann plant, methanation is now purely biological. Highly specialized microorganisms absorb the hydrogen that is dissolved in liquid and the carbon dioxide through their cell walls. From these molecules they then form the new molecule methane. The process is run under a moderate pressure of around 5 bar and at relatively low temperatures. “We are writing the next chapter of the Audi e-gas story here,” said Reiner Mangold, head of Sustainable Product Development at Audi. “Audi began to produce the sustainable fuel in Werlte around two years ago. Now we are also working with a partner who immediately contributed this new process.”

Thanks to the new partnership, Audi will be able to supply a growing number of customers with sustainably produced e-gas in the future. Simultaneously, the brand with the four rings is also extending its line-up of models with natural gas drive.

At the end of 2016, sales of the new Audi A4 Avant g-tron begin in Europe. This is the second CNG model from Audi after the Audi A3 Sportback g-tron, which has been on the market since the beginning of 2014. Customers can run both g-tron models on gasoline as well as on conventional natural gas, biomethane or the sustainably produced Audi e-gas.

March 9, 2016

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Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

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