All new emissions testing cycle comes into force

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The European testing procedure NEDC has been replaced with the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP). The change will affect how vehicles are emissions tested.

The new procedure, which measures fuel consumption, CO₂, NOx and particulates by mass and number (PM/PN), will cover a greater range of vehicle and engine speeds, engine load, gear changes and temperatures than the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). This means that modern vehicle technology can be accounted for.

As well as a tough new laboratory test, all newly launched car models will have to undergo robust on-road testing before they go on sale.

Mike Hawes, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) chief executive, said, “We welcome this challenging new regime, which will provide hard evidence that the industry’s ongoing investment in ever more advanced technology is delivering on air quality goals.

“Combined, these new and demanding tests will soon give consumers emissions performance information that is far closer to what they experience behind the wheel – and inspire greater confidence that the new cars they buy are not only the cleanest, but the most fuel efficient ever produced.”

After an agreement was reached on the requirement specifications, the new legislation comes into effect this month. Newly designed cars will have to comply before being marketed.

This means consumers could start to see these brand-new models arrive in showrooms from as early as next year. By September 1, 2018, all new cars on sale will have undergone WLTP testing and by September 1, 2019, all will have undergone the full RDE testing for both NOx and PN.

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About Author

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Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

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