UK government invests US$41.3m in low-carbon future

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The UK government has invested US$41.3m in next-generation technologies to help the automotive sector build a low carbon future.

The latest round of funding through the Advanced Propulsion Centre is expected to secure and create up to 2,230 jobs in research and manufacturing.

The funded projects range from the development of high-performance battery packs and electrified construction equipment, to hydrogen-powered engines, as well as helping support the establishment of future supply chains.

McLaren Applied Technologies is the lead partner in the Escape project, which is receiving US$12.2m funding to create a complete end-to-end supply chain for a key component to be used in all electrified vehicles.

Ian Constance, chief executive of the Advanced Propulsion Centre, said, “Supporting the development of cutting-edge low-carbon vehicle technology is crucial to ensuring we have a robust supply chain that enables the future of the UK automotive industry.

“The wide range of projects awarded funding is proof that there isn’t one answer to reducing transport emissions. We must continue to collaborate across sectors in order to boost innovation in many aspects of the industry so we can take advantage of export opportunities to other markets.”

Other successful projects receiving funding are Tata Motors European Technical Centre’s ZETE project, which has developed an ultra-clean engine that reduces emissions in high pollutant sectors; Unipart Powertrain Applications’ H1perChain project that aims to strengthen the UK’s battery industry by providing a cost-effective route for UK-manufactured batteries into domestic and export markets; and YASA’s EV-Lift project that aims to produce a best-in-class Electronic Drive Unit (EDU) for next generation BEVs.

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Sam joined the UKi Media & Events automotive team in 2017, having recently graduated from the University of Brighton with a degree in journalism. For the newest addition to the editorial team, stepping into the assistant editor position signalled the start of a career in the subject he studied. In addition to his work on UKi’s automotive titles, Sam also contributes to Stadia, writing content for the magazine and website.

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