New e-record for nanoFlowcell AG

0

At the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show, nanoFlowcell AG showcased a ‘safe and environmentally compatible’ electromobility concept, which it claimed uses technologies already developed by the company.

nanoFlowcell’s ‘flow cell’ technology brings together elements of battery and fuel cells to generate non-flammable, non-explosive electrolytes. Whilst this isn’t a new technology in itself, Quant states that the use of it to power a car is a step forward for electromobility.

Despite performance figures of zero to 100km/h in less than five seconds and a top speed of 200km/h, the QUANTiNO is claimed to deliver a range in excess of 1,000km.

The QUANTiNO was recently granted a road licence for Europe, and in its first endurance test drove for 14 hours non-stop. Over the course of the run, the average fuel consumption was around 12 to 14kWh per 100kms. When La Vecchia was forced to stop driving due to fatigue after 14 hours and three minutes, the two 159-litre electrolyte tanks in the QUANTiNO were still 78% full.

“With nanoFlowcell we are demonstrating that electromobility no longer means having to make compromises. Our vehicles are sporty, dynamic, environmentally friendly and fuel efficient with zero harmful emissions,” said Nunzio La Vecchia. “We are showing that the nanoFlowcell technology we have developed is more than just an alternative for our mobility and to all other drive concepts. As we see it, nanoFlowcell is the future of electromobility.”

La Vecchia continued, “What we are showing is a feasible and concrete route to achieving sustainable, clean and safe mobility in the future. And we are open to taking that route with strong partners from the automotive industry.”

March 18, 2016

Share.

About Author

mm

Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

Comments are closed.