McLaren 675LT: the knowledge

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McLaren has sold all 500 examples of its more intense 675 Longtail with production beginning this month.

To coincide with the beginning of production and first deliveries of the new car, McLaren has revealed some more of the details of the technical features underneath the bodywork.

More than 50% of the components were tweaked for this installation, so the engine code gains a letter over that in the standard 650S: M838TL. The 3.8-litre twin-turbo V8 produces 675ps at 7,100rpm, with a torque figure of 700Nm at 5,500-6,500rpm.

The engines were designed in collaboration with Ricardo, and assembly takes place at the engineering firm’s Shoreham facility in the UK.

Those dizzying output figures make for performance numbers of 0-100 km/h in 2.9sec, 0-200km/h in 7.9sec and a top speed of 330km/h. McLaren saved 100kg over the 650S through extensive use of carbonfibre throughout the car, including lightweight materials and tweaks within the powertrain that have cut 6kg and a bespoke crossover titanium exhaust that has saved a further 1.1kg. Overall, it makes for a power-to-weight ratio of 549ps per tonne.

Other details include a dry sump that helps prevent oil surge, a flat-plane crankshaft that means the engine could be mounted lower in the car, and twin-turbos with electronic wastegates feature machined-from-solid compressor wheels that maximise airflow into the combustion chambers.

McLaren also says it has concentrated its weight saving inside the engine on components that would remove mass and inertia in the drivetrain, improving the responsiveness and drivability of the car.

See what you think of the car with this new video from McLaren of the 675LT in action. 

July 30, 2015

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Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

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