First Detroit Electric SP:01 rolls off the line

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The SP:01 is based on a rolling chassis supplied by Lotus that makes up the Elise. The electric powertrain has been developed in-house by Detroit Electric.

Detroit Electric claims a class-leading power-to-weight ratio, with the 285ps, 280Nm car taking its 1,175kg to 100km/h in 3.9 seconds and a top speed of 249km/h.

The SP:01 comes with a single-speed automatic transmission as standard, but is available with a twin-speed auto or a six-speed manual transmission.

It is fitted with a single-speed automatic transmission as standard, with optional twin-speed or six-speed manual transmissions.

The battery in the SP:01 has been integrated into the chassis as a stressed member, adding stiffness to enhance handling and safety. Detroit Electric says that the battery is the most energy-dense automotive battery pack in the world, offering over 140Wh/kg, benefitting range while keeping overall vehicle weight low.

Range from the 37kWh battery is 288km on the NEDC, and each car comes with Detroit Electric’s home charging and power back-up unit called 360-Powerback, which takes advantage of the car’s built-in bi-directional charge and discharge capability.

The company is the brainchild of former Lotus Engineering Group CEO, Albert Lam, who resurrected the Detroit Electric name in 2008. The original Detroit Electric was an EV produced by the Anderson Electric Car Company in Detroit, between 1907 and 1939.

“We are thrilled to see our first production car roll off the line,” said Lam. “As our production process builds momentum, we look forward to providing this unique electric sports car to our customers all over the world.”

November 4, 2015

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Dean has been with UKi Media & Events for over a decade, having previously cut his journalistic teeth writing and editing for various automotive and engineering titles. He combines extensive knowledge of all things automotive with a passion for driving, and experience testing countless new vehicles, engines and technologies around the world. As well as his role as editor-in-chief across a range of UKi's media titles, he is also co-chair of the judging panel of the International Engine of the Year Awards.

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