Supplier Spotlight

Video Exclusives

Mercedes-Benz unveils its revamped G-Class

gtr

The all-new G-Class makes its public debut at the Detroit auto show in G550 form. Completely redeveloped and fitted with a 4.0-liter V8 biturbo gasoline engine offering 427ps and 450 lb-ft of torque at 2,000rpm to 4,750rpm, despite near-identical looks to its predecessor plenty has changed for the Mercedes-Benz SUV.


Ford’s F150 pickup gets its first diesel motor

gtr

Developed by the powertrain team behind the 6.7-liter Power Stroke engine for super duty trucks, the all-new 3.0-liter V6 Power Stroke unit promises 250ps, 440 lb-ft of torque, and an anticipated 5175kg of towing capacity.


Click here/on image to watch video

In light of Fisker's solid-state battery breakthrough and claims of a one minute charge time, will this electric vehicle technology development kick-start mass BEV uptake? 

News

Ford using computer-printed parts to accelerate product development

When Ford’s EcoBoost-powered race car hit the track at the Belle Isle Grand Prix last weekend (May 29-31) in Detroit, Michigan, it was using engine parts made by a computer printer. Using 3D printing, parts such as the intake manifold on the Ford EcoBoost race engine used in the Chip Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates Daytona Prototype car are now created on a printer.

“3D computer printers have totally changed the development process for our Daytona Prototype race cars,” said Victor Martinez, 3.5-liter EcoBoost race engine engineer.

“3D printing has advanced at such lightning speed in recent years that in a matter of hours, we can create real, usable parts for race cars. That’s exactly what we did for the 24 Hours of Daytona earlier this year.”

Ford first started to 3D-print decades ago, purchasing the third 3D printer ever made in 1988. The company first used 3D-printed parts for prototype buttons, switches and knobs. As the technology has improved, the quality of 3D-printed parts has become remarkably precise, and the parts themselves have become increasingly usable.

So smooth and precise has the finishing process become that 3D-printed parts are now used in real-world settings – on prototype vehicles built for durability testing, and on the Ford race car that won the gruelling 24 Hours of Daytona in January.

In the competitive world of endurance racing, the push for increased reliability and horsepower never stops and, in Ford’s rapid prototype lab, it doesn’t have to.

“We have the ability to design an entirely new part and, one week later, have that part in hand,” says Martinez. “This lets the engineers who develop our cars – both for road and track – spend more time testing, tuning and refining.”

Computer-aided design mock-ups are sent to Ford’s rapid prototype lab where they are analyzed and input into one of many 3D printers. Roughly one week later, a finished product is ready to be cleaned, painted and used.

“Toward the end of the 2014 Tudor United SportsCar Championship season, we began to design a number of revisions for our intake manifold,” explains Martinez. “In order to rapidly prototype and prove them out, we 3D-printed several intakes and tested them on our dyno and verified performance on the track. The iterations we created based on the 2014 intake manifold accelerated the development on our 2015 manifold – which is both lighter and brings improved airflow.”

Leading up to the 2015 24 Hours of Daytona, Ford Performance engineers opted for a 3D-printed intake manifold for the Chip Ganassi Racing Daytona Prototype car. Employing the most advanced intake yet printed, in combination with carbon fiber intake plenums developed by Multimatic, a strong, reliable and lightweight intake manifold was created for the No. 02 Target Ford EcoBoost-Riley.

“The prototype manifold exceeded our expectations in testing, so in the essence of time we decided to use it for the race,” says Martinez. “We modified our intake with carbon fiber components, painted it, and then it was ready to go to the track.”

June 2, 2015

2 June 2015


RECEIVE THE
LATEST NEWS


Your email address:





Read Latest Issue
International Engine of the Year Awards
Read Latest Issue

Web Exclusive Articles

Hyundai 2019 Veloster N: The Knowledge
Designed specifically for the US market and officially unveiled at the 2018 Detroit auto show this month, Hyundai’s 2.0-liter turbocharged Veloster N has been developed to deliver driveability rather than outright performance statistics.
Read Now

Renault Trucks reveals how mixed reality can improve engine quality control
Renault Trucks, in collaboration with Immersion, is evaluating the potential of mixed reality to deliver a new, faster and more reliable quality control process at its Lyon engine manufacturing site.
Read Now

BAIC Motor on the industry’s fuel economy performance ambitions
BAIC has teamed up with Siemens to implement vehicle energy management and model-based systems engineering as the Chinese OEM works towards optimal fuel efficiency
Read Now

Read Latest Issue

Supplier Spotlight

Supplier SpotlightClick here for listings and information on leading suppliers covering all aspects of the engine technology industry. Want to see your company included? Contact aboobaker.tayub@ukimediaevents.com for more details.

Submit your industry opinion

Industry BlogDo you have an opinion you'd like to share with the engine technology community? We'd like to hear your views and opinions on the leading issues shaping the industry. Share your comments by sending up to 500 words to d.slavnich@ukimediaevents.com

Submit Your Recruitment Ad

Recruitment AdTo send us your recruitment advertising or to receive information on placing a banner please email aboobaker.tayub@ukimediaevents.com